#113 – TO PAN OUT


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= when a situation develops in a certain way
“We’re not sure how this is going to pan out”
Or
“It didn’t pan out as we expected”

Transcript
Hello, you’re listening to “A Phrasal Verb a Day”. My name’s Luke Thompson. This is a phrasal verb number 113. Just time for a quick phrasal verb for you today. This one is to PAN OUT. PAN OUT. PAN spelt P A N, OUT spelt O U T. PAN OUT.
And to PAN OUT basically means to… We use this to describe the way the situation develops. Okay? It’s a bit like “to turn out”. “Things didn’t turn out as we expected”, for example. PAN OUT. So, it basically means when a situation develops. So, you might say “Let’s just wait and see how this situation PANS OUT before we make a decision”. Okay? Or, you might say “Things didn’t PAN OUT as I expected”. Okay? Or “We’re not really sure how things are going to PAN OUT, so let’s just wait and see what happens”. Alright? Typically, you would have phrases like PAN OUT and then an adverb like “They PANNED OUT differently to how we expected” or “PAN OUT as we expect”, okay? So, (it) just means “develop in the future”. Let’s see.

Alright, let’s have a quick look on Google News for some examples. Top Gear, you know, the TV program that deals with cars, they also have a website on which they, you know, publish stories about cars. Here’s… something from Top Gear. It says “The aims of using current technologies”. So, predicting current technologies. “We try and predict how they will PAN OUT in twenty years time”, so, try and predict how technologies will PAN OUT over the next twenty years, meanings how technologies will develop, okay?

Let’s see. Social media is a marketing tool. This is an extract from something for Forbes Magazine. It says, “If we make a calculated risk and it doesn’t PAN OUT, that’s okay”. “If we make a calculated risk and it doesn’t PAN OUT, that’s okay”. Meaning if we take a risk and we spend some money on certain types of marketing and it doesn’t develop in a certain way, then that’s okay. If it doesn’t PAN OUT as we expected, it’s okay.

Another example, you know, “This means that if things PAN OUT as we expect, we don’t have to make more cuts”. Alright?
Miami Heat NBA 2015 news. This is news about the American Basketball Association. Will Dwyane Wade opt out?. Oh, there is a phrasal verb that we’ve already had. Will Dwyane Wade opt out? This means “Will Dwyane Wade probably choose to… choose to opt out of some kind of basketball game?”, “Will he choose to not be be involved in the game?” and it says “Seeing that the move didn’t PAN OUT and meet expectations it looks like the 33 year old NBA star will adopt a different approach this summer”. Things didn’t PAN OUT as he expected, so he’s having to choose a different approach this summer.

Okay? There you go. That was to PAN OUT. I wonder how things are going to PAN OUT for the future of “A Phrasal Verb a Day”. Hopefully, they’ll PAN OUT as I expected and I’ll manage to get to that target of three hundred and sixty-five episodes. I think we are somewhere in the region of one third of the way there or about thirty-three percent of the way there. It’s a long game this. Let’s see if I can make it. We’ll see how things PAN OUT as we move into the future. That’s it for this episode. Speak to you again soon but for now… goodbye.

  • Andrzej

    Transcripts for #112 and #113 are ready

    Luke, why do you say: “Things didn’t pan out as I expected”, “They panned out differently to how we expected” while it seams to me that you should say: “Things didn’t pan out as I’d expected”, “They panned out differently to how we’d expected”? I mean past perfect in second close. Thanks in advance for your answer.

    • Good point. I think sometimes we don’t use past perfect when it’s unnecessary from the context. I think because of the word ‘expected’ it’s clear we’re talking about how we felt before the other thing happened.

      • Andrzej

        Dozens of times I have vowed not to discuss grammar, especially tenses, of one sentence without a wider context. It’s good for students that have nothing better to do. Yesterday I did it again. Of course I knew the rule you mentioned as well as some others when PP is not obligatory. I must’ve been really tired to have bothered you. Sorry and thanks again.

      • No worries! ;)

  • Zdim

    It panned out differently to how we had expected.