#85 – TO MISS OUT


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Transcript

Hello, I’m Luke Thompson. You’re listening to ‘A Phrasal Verb a Day’. This is phrasal verb number 85 and it’s ‘to miss out’, ‘to miss out’ and we also use the word ‘on’ to extend it – ‘to miss out on something’, okay? So, as an intransitive verb it’s just a ‘miss out’ but if you want to add an object on the end you would use ‘on’ as well – ‘to miss out on something’. We’re looking at two things, really. The first one is ‘to miss an opportunity’ so, if you miss an opportunity to do something. So, for example:

– I really MISSED OUT ON the chance to get famous

for example

– I really MISSED OUT ON an opportunity

For example:

Recently I launched a competition on Luke’s English Podcast where people could send recordings in and I played all the recordings on the Podcast and then other people could vote on which one is their favourite. A lot of people sent recordings in but I’m sure there were lots of people out there who felt like:

– Oh, I really MISSED OUT ON that

meaning they didn’t send me a recording and so they missed the opportunity to take part.

– I really MISSED OUT ON the chance to take part in Luke’s competition

for example. You might say as well:

– Don’t worry we will be repeating the questions later so you won’t MISS OUT

okay? Or if you were an athlete, let’s say, and you’re running the one hundred metres and you try and beat Usain Bolt’s world record and you’re just one half second slower than Bolt you could say:

– Oh, I can’t believe. I so narrowly MISSED OUT ON being the Guinness World Record holder

for example. I guess, is it Guinness that records like Olympic world records? I don’t think so. I think it’s the Olympic Federation or something.

– He just MISSED OUT ON becoming the fastest man on Earth

for example. Here’s another one as well which means that you don’t include something by accident:

– Oh, really sorry, Timmy, I completely MISSED YOU OUT, didn’t I?

You know, if you like reading out the names of the football team and you mentioned everyone on the football team but you forget little Timmy, and little Timmy is there crying

– Aaaa…, you forgot me
– Oh, little Timmy, I completely MISSED YOU OUT

meaning I completely forgot to include you. So, I didn’t include you or I omitted you, for example.

It could be, for example, Jonathan’s doing his marketing presentation:

– So, here’s the plan for the… this is what I’ve mapped out over the next six months for the marketing plan. So, we can see stage one, we create the product and then stage three there, everyone buys it. That’s the end of my presentation. Thanks for listening.

and then someone goes:

– Sorry Jonathan, I think you might’ve MISSED something OUT there. Yeah, you MISSED OUT the whole marketing aspect in the middle. You just said: ‘we invent the product and then people buy it’ but you MISSED OUT, well, you MISSED OUT everything really in this marketing plan
– Oh, yeah, that’s right, sorry. Oh, let me go back and start again.

Alright, so that’s ‘to miss something out’.

Alright, that’s the end of this recording and I hope this phrasal verb episodes are useful. I’ve been a little bit slack when it comes to recording them all as you’ve noticed. There’s been a huge gap. I think the last time I uploaded… I’ve just done episode 81, 82, 83, 84, 85 in one little session which is quite a good idea. I should try and do that more often. The last one I did before this was at the beginning of September. So I’m very sorry for my intermittent recordings of ‘A Phrasal Verb a Day’ but you know how it is ladies and gentlemen. I’m a busy man. I’m Luke from Luke’s English Podcast but I’m going to try and do my best to keep these episodes fresh so I can upload them as regularly as I can and don’t forget to visit teacherluke.co.uk/phrasal-verb-a-day/ and you’ll find notes and transcripts for almost all of the episodes, okay? So, if you’re just listening using iTunes or other podcasting software don’t forget to visit the website because there’s a lot of stuff there available for you which is going to help you in your quest to improve your English. I’m talking about transcripts of every single word that I’ve said in certainly first 80 episodes of ‘A Phrasal Verb a Day’. teacherluke.co.uk There’s a button in the menu that says ‘A PHRASAL VERB A DAY’. Click it and the world will be yours. That’s the end of this recording. Speak to you again soon. Bye.

  • riddle

    I’m a slack too when it comes to doing my homework! Just kidding! I’m a astute, exemplary student. Luke, I’m going to comfort you. I’m not angry at your for your intermittent podcasts:D:DD:
    It’s even better when one waits for something. Last Saturday I missed out on the chance to go abroad. I simply forgot about my booked tickets. All my plans went up in smoke… what am I supposed to do, huh? AA I know, I’ll book new ones. Or even better – I’ll rob a bank or even two and get lots of cash. Or I’ll get arrested in the process. We’ll see. I missed out today’s train to Prague! Can I say like that? Luke, I’m waiting for your feedback on this one. I’ve been commenting on your podcasts for a while. I don’t even know if someone reads it. Anyway, it’s a good way to practise. In fact, I don’t care if someone reads my rambling writing. What counts is that I get to write in this worldwide popular tongue.

    • I read them all but I haven’t had a chance to comment or reply. I can’t always give feedback on everything because I just don’t have time – I’d be sitting in front of my computer all the time! Please keep commenting though. I think it’s good for your English and I hope to give feedback eventually.

  • Andrzej

    Hi Luke, There’s something strange happening with this transcript at 3:12. Writing it I heard something like ‘slug’ therefore I put this word into the transcript but you changed it into ‘slow’. Sorry Luke, but it doesn’t sound like ‘slow’ to me at all. Could you please make it clear to me if you can spare a minute of your precious time or shall I ask Jeff?

    • It’s the word ‘slack’ – I’ve replaced it ;)

      • Andrzej

        Thank you Luke for the explanation. English language has definitely got too many words as for me. It turns out that fairly limited vocabulary is enough for everyday survival (travelling, eating, shopping etc.) but when it comes to talking about details or listening to natives – decent vocabulary is indispensable. So, thanks even for ‘being slack’ ;)

      • You’re welcome.
        It means being a bit lazy or careless, just in case you were wondering.