#88 – TO MOVE IN / TO MOVE OUT


Small Donate Button[Download]
1. start living in a new flat or house. “I moved in last week. We’re having a housewarming party on Saturday”
(to move out = to stop living somewhere and leave e.g. “She’s asked me to move out! I can’t believe it’s over. I’m going to move back in with my parents)
2. To move in with someone = to start living in someone else’s place.
3. To get closer in order to attack or arrest someone. E.g. “Troops yesterday began moving in while the negotiations were taking place.”

Transcript
Hello, this is Luke Thompson and you’re listening to ‘A Phrasal Verb a Day’ and this is phrasal verb number 88 which is ‘to move in’ and also ‘to move out’ as well. So, let’s look at three different meanings of ‘move in’ and we’ll also consider the expression ‘to move out’ while we’re doing it. So, first of all ‘to move in’ means to start living in a new flat or in a new house. For example:

– I moved in last week. We’re having a housewarming party on Saturday.

So, I moved in, meaning I started living in my new place, okay? ‘To move in’. Now, the opposite of that is ‘to move out’, so that means to stop living somewhere and leave. For example:

– She’s asked me to move out. I can’t believe it’s over. I’m going to move back in with my parents.

So, she’s asked me to move out, meaning she’s asked me to leave, take all my stuff and give her the key back. She’s asked me to move out so I’m going to move out on Saturday. It’s terrible. The whole relationship’s over. I’m moving out on Saturday and I’m going to move back in with my parents. What a nightmare. Okay. So, ‘to move in’ and ‘to move out’.

You could also say to ‘to move in with someone’ for example:

– I’m going to move back in with my parents

or

– I’m going to move in with my parents

or

– I’m moving in with my girlfriend

or

– I’ve asked her to move in with me

That means to start living in someone else’s place, okay? ‘To move in’ or ‘to move in with someone’.

The third one means to get closer in order to attack or arrest someone. So, It’s something what we associate with the police or with the army. For example:

– Troops yesterday began moving in while the negotiations were taking place

So, that means moving closer in a sort of aggressive way, usually associated with the police or with the army, for example:

– Police began moving in on the protesters during the afternoon

for example. Okay, that was ‘to move in on someone’ wasn’t it? Yeah, okay.

Alright, there you go. That’s the end of this episode. Thanks very much for listening but for now it’s time for me to say ‘goodbye’ so, I’m going to say ‘goodbye’ right now and here it is – goodbye.