HELLO and WELCOME!

Enjoy learning and listening to English, free!
Luke’s English Podcast started in 2009 and is still going strong. With over 200 episodes, transcripts, videos and a special series on phrasal verbs, there is so much for you to use, and it’s all free. The podcast has been downloaded over 2 million times in the last 12 months and this website won the Macmillan Dictionary Award for Best Blog in 2011, 2012 & 2013.

10679850_4629218585900_8637988205879675701_oI’m Luke and I produce the podcast at home in my flat. I’m a DELTA-qualified English teacher from London with over 13 years of teaching experience. I’m also a stand-up comedian. My podcast offers you an insightful learning resource, which aims to make you laugh while you learn.

Join hundreds of thousands of listeners from around the world, and listen to Luke’s English Podcast. Get started here with the first episode of the podcast, recorded back in 2009 or click here to see an archive list of all the episodes and their pages on this website.

646 thoughts on “HELLO and WELCOME!

  1. Gleb (@Gleb_93)

    Dear Luke, I started to listen to your podcasts recently. I have a question about using these materials. Is there a need to listen to one podcast many time for repetition or no? I try to combine your podcasts with a method (maybe you know by A J Hoge), and I use one set of lessons during one week usually. Or one time of listening is enough? Thank you very much!!!

    Reply
    1. Luke Thompson Post author

      Hi Gleb,
      I always suggest that people listen to episodes more than once because with repeat listens you notice language details you didn’t notice before and you become more familiar with phrases you hear. Some people listen to certain episodes again and again until lots of phrases and sections are stuck in their head completely. Some listeners repeat all of it word for word as they listen, some use transcripts to record themselves repeating everything, and some people just listen to each episode once and that suits them fine!
      If you’re really keen to make the most of these episodes, I do recommend that you listen several times. Have fun ;)

      Reply
    1. Luke Thompson Post author

      Yes, Audioboo have re-branded themselves as AudioBoom. It’s the same, but the name is a bit cooler. Also, they have a new app for iOS (and Android soon) which you can use to listen to audio (including LEP). Visit AudioBoom.com for more information. ;)

      Reply
  2. Vladimir Mertel

    Hi Luke,
    I have been listening LEP for two years and ( not surprisingly) it helps me a lot. I am from Serbia, province Vojvodina which main town is Novi Sad. Your father have worked in Serbia and he had mainly good impression about people in my country and I am very glad because of that. Have you had any listeners from Serbia ? I think I am the first one but I hope not the only one!
    Best wishes ,
    Vladimir

    Reply
  3. Gabi

    Dear Luke, if Londoners have a cockney accent (which I can recognise by the glottal stop), why don’t you have this glottal stop, cockney accent features as most Londoners?

    Reply
    1. Luke Thompson Post author

      First of all, let me explain the difference between ‘cockney’ and ‘London’:
      Cockneys are just a small community of people living in a certain area of East London. They’re known for their strong London accent (including glottal stops), their rhyming slang, and certain other cultural characteristics. Not everyone who lives in London is a cockney, however, the typical London accent is very similar to the cockney accent. In fact, many people say “cockney” accent when they mean ‘working-class London accent’. So, basically – the cockney accent and the ‘working-class London accent’ sound pretty much the same, but true cockneys only live in a small area of East London.

      Now, why don’t I have a London accent like the cockneys?
      I have traces of this accent – like sometimes I drop my /t/ sounds and use glottal stops, but generally speaking I speak with a modern ‘RP’ accent. RP stands for Received Pronunciation, and it’s an accent which is traditionally associated with middle or upper middle class people (although lots of people don’t agree with class distinctions these days). I suppose it’s because my parents believed that RP was a clearer and more neutral way to speak English, and so they spoke like that and brought me up to speak like that too. Also, being an English teacher for nearly 14 years has taught me to speak clearly (but not necessarily slowly). So, that’s why I don’t speak like a cockney, or with a ‘working-class’ London accent.

      There are many different accent varieties in London. There’s the cockney accent (or ‘working-class London accent, or ‘estuary accent’ as some call it) Also there’s modern RP (like me and plenty of other people, like a lot of reporters on the BBC for example), and there’s posh RP (spoken by really high-society, aristocratic people). As well as that you find accents with a Jamaican influence, an Indian influence and a few other varieties too.

      So, London has many accents, not just the one we associate with cockneys.
      I hope that answers your question. Let me know if you’re still confused about anything :)

      Luke

      Reply
      1. Gabi

        Wow, that already answers a doubt I had since I learnt about accents. And one more thing: do English people really use RP on daily speaking or I’d sound like a foreigner if I speak with RP?

        Reply
        1. Luke Thompson Post author

          It depends on the person. Lots of people speak with an RP accent, but lots of people speak with regional accents too. I suggest that you learn RP because it’s clear and it’s not specific to one region of the UK. Also, all the pronunciation books are based on RP.

          Reply
  4. Teodora C.

    Thank you for another great episode, teacher Luke.
    I do believe that training our ears by listening to non-native speakers as well is part of the learning process.I mean, we do not always meet native speakers, do we?
    What matters is being able to communicate and learn from each other, enrich our cultural heritage and have some fun, too.
    Thank you for inviting Corneliu Dragomirescu. I’m looking forward to listening to the second part of the interview on the issue of Romanian workers abroad.
    Have a great week!

    Reply
  5. Ilka Schumacher

    Hi Luke,

    happy I found your great podcast during my summer vacation in Scotland. As I am a teacher for German as a second Language I just can say, your are a very good teacher. Your podcasts are entertaining you speak in a very nice speed, so I can understand 99 percent. It is easy to pick up a lot of new usefull vocabs are grammar structure. I enjoy listening to your podcasts during my running session.( 20 km are enough for two of them). I guess sometimes people might think I am crazy because you make me smile or laugh. I have lived in Malaysia for 2,5 years as an expat wife so the podcasts about Japan and Indonesia really touched me. I knew what you and your friend were talking about and I am glad your wife survived, she easily could have died. Tough lady.
    I have a question, my daughter who attended The British School in Kuala Lumpur hates my accent. So what do you think about the RP accent. Is it old fashioned? Posh? Or recomandable as people all over the world can understand you?

    Stay as you are, you are really unique.

    Greetings Ilka

    How did you do the Darth Vader sound? I don’t think sleepless people turn into something bad. All of us have a dark side in ourselves, some more some less. Sometimes we get in situations where we have to decide on which side we want to live.

    Reply
  6. masoud

    DEAR LUKE
    THIS IS MASOUD,
    IT HAS BEEN 4 MONTHS SINCE I AM UR FRIEND
    I AM FAR AWAY FROM U , BUT THERE IS SOMETHING THAT I DO NOT KNOW HOW TO EXPRESS
    U KNOW WORDS R SO POWERLESS TO CONVEY TRUE MEANING OF MY LIKING FOR U BECAUSE OF AWESOME HELP THAT U HAVE DONE THROUGH UR PODCASTS
    I HAVE LISTENED TO THE PODCSTS UP TO TRACK NO 190 , AND I AM COVERING THE REST IN SOME TIME …..

    HAVING ENTRANCE EXAM IN 4 MONTHS FOR MY -MASTER OF ART- I HAVE MADE MY MY UP TO SACRIFICE A HUGE AMOUNT OF MY TIME FOR HITTING THE BOOKS, INCLUDING THE NORTON ANTHOLOY BY ABRAHMS U MAY KNOW IT ,, I WONDER!

    U MAY MISS ME!

    DO NOT WORRY IT WILL NOT TAKE TOO LONG !
    PODCAST MORE FOR ME TO COME AFRESH AND DOWNLOAD THEM ALL
    I HAVE BURNED THAT STERYOTYPE ABOUT SNOBBISHNESS OF BRITISH PEOPLE AFTER MAKING FRIENDS WITH U! U R NOT THAT KIND OF MAN AS A REAL LONDONER!

    ANY WAY AFTER LISTENING TO U I HAVE MADE A GREAT LONDON ACCENT INDEED, TNX!

    WHAT U DO, I MEAN POD CASTING IS INDEED WORTH FOR ALL PEOPLE AND GOD AS WELL!
    THNX ANY WAY TO HAVE ANSWERED TO MY LAST TEXT.

    KEEP UR FINGERS CROSSED FOR ME
    COME AND VISIT IRAN
    URS MASOUD BASHI!
    ,

    Reply
  7. com

    my dear dude friend ,
    having checked out and not seen all my querries here in ur page , i just thoght u were pissed off , am i right ?
    just let this text manifest in order to show my thoughts r silly in this case……

    Reply
    1. Luke Thompson Post author

      Don’t worry, I have been at a big wedding all weekend and I haven’t had good internet access so I haven’t been able to allow all comments on my website. I’ve had 50+ comments on the website this weekend but I haven’t had time to approve any of them, except this one. Right now I’m standing in a queue at the airport. ;)

      Reply
      1. Anonymous

        When are you having YOUR big wedding then, Luke? ;) Anyway, I really like those episodes featuring a small chat between you and your friends, as the episode no.220. Don’t be bothered about rambling on the podcast. In fact, it is rather difficult to maintain a conversation by merely talking about “nonsense” (though I don’t consider it as “nonsense” indeed). Feeling comfortable to talk about trivial things is brilliant XD. It shows that one has already got used to the language he/she is speaking.

        Reply
  8. Elisa

    I’m probably a bit cynical … why does it have to be winners and losers in all of what is going on … It’s nice to be involved, but if you want to compete, you should be able to do it at the same level as the other competitors. It would be fair to everyone, I think. -e-

    Reply
    1. Luke Thompson Post author

      Hi Elisa, I just wanted to make this a competition in order to involve more people and to give it a more exciting feeling. I don’t mean to make it harshly competitive and divisive between “winners” and “losers”. In my opinion, there are no losers anyway. I’m really proud of everyone who sent in a recording.
      Perhaps next time I do this I will change it and remove the competitive aspect, although I get the impression that quite a lot of people are enjoying that part of it. Ultimately, it’s a chance for listeners to be heard on the podcast as a celebration of the 5th birthday of LEP, and the competitive part is secondary to that.

      Reply
  9. YOURS SINCERELY

    Dear luke
    Hi
    You are right SOME OF YOUR LISTENERS DONT FOLLOW THE COMPETITION, I AM ONE OF THEM,
    the reason is that thousands of people are following your podcasts because of your correct, authentic and fluent speaking, we are all learners, we need to listen to correct pronunciation and structure, althought i respect all, why should i listen to someone who is not fluent and makes lots of mistakes,same as like me,
    it is not only about competitors but also for some of your interviewees in podcasts who cant speak correctly.
    we consider your podcasts as a model for our pronunciation and grammar.

    WHAT IS YOUR OPINION?

    thanks for your attention.

    Reply
    1. Luke Thompson Post author

      Dear commenter,

      Thank you for your message. First of all let me state that I know what you mean. I know what attracts many of my listeners to my podcast. When I started the YEP Competition I knew that some people would not be interested in hearing recordings of other listeners. That’s why I said right at the beginning of episode 211 that listeners were under no obligation to listen to the mini YEP series, and that they could just skip those episodes if they wanted. Let me repeat that for you – you don’t have to listen to the competition entries, you can just skip them and listen to other episodes.

      That brings us to your other point, which is that I’ve featured a few non-native speakers of English on my podcast recently. I think you’re referring to episodes with my guests Yacine (#182), Nikolai (#201), Noman (#210), and possibly Corneliu (#220) too. I understand that you prefer listening to native speakers on the podcast. Nevertheless, I made the decision to feature some non-natives on LEP. This is because I wanted to present these guests as motivating examples of English learners who, despite not having perfect English yet, were already having a lot of success in their English communication. Despite making mistakes they were able to confidently communicate their ideas in English on stage, have fun with the language and improve their English and confidence in the process. The point was to use them as an example for other listeners who struggle with confidence, as a way of showing them “Yes, you can do it too”. The idea is to help my listeners to build confidence in using English.

      Those episodes are not just for confidence though – it’s also possible to learn language points in them, through the bits of error correction that I did. I corrected all the errors made by my guest in #210 in the language feedback section at the end of the episode, I corrected quite a lot of the errors in #182 during the conversation, and the other two non-natives didn’t make any notable errors in my opinion. Corneliu in particular speaks naturally, with an American accent. Admittedly, he did say “good in physics” not “good at physics” but I let it slide, because life’s too short.

      I’ve had lots of positive responses to those four episodes, so although you’re not fond of them, plenty of other listeners are. I know that inspiring confidence is an important part of helping people to improve their English communication skills, and that’s a big part of my justification for featuring those non-native speakers onto the podcast.

      Still, I do understand why you might not be interested in episodes featuring non-natives, and if that is the case, I refer you to the 200+ other episodes which focus on the English of native speakers. If you’re concerned that my podcast is going to feature more and more non-native speakers, don’t worry – that’s not the plan, although I should ‘warn’ you that there will be one or two episodes later this year in which I interview winners from the YEP Competition. You might want to avoid them if you feel that’s not your cup of tea.

      If it reassures you at all, let me tell you about the plans for the next 5 episodes of LEP. Episode 221 will be part 2 of my conversation with Corneliu (which I hope you listen to, but I’ll understand if you don’t), then I’m going to upload an episode which features just me talking about music, then a film-related episode in which I discuss the action thriller “Taken”, then another Skype interview between me and my brother and then a conversation with 4 English friends on a boat (yep, they’re all native speakers). So, fret not – it’s business as usual and I plan to continue like that of course.

      Thank you again for your comment. Do reply if you’d like to tell me more about yourself or your thoughts. I do try to make everyone happy with my podcast – although this is clearly impossible! You can’t please all the people all the time, only some of the people some of the time.

      Best regards,

      Luke

      Reply
      1. Mark

        Sorry, but the most of English out there is actually being uttered by non-natives, rather than natives. So why not to train your ears for all kinds of possible English you may run into in the world???

        Reply
    1. Anonymous

      Wow! What a great speech from a teenager! Sam’s speech is one of the best motivational speech I have ever heard. Thanks Luke for posting such a life changing speech in your page.

      Reply
      1. Luke Thompson Post author

        Actually, I didn’t post it. It was posted by an anonymous guest on the website. I agree, it is a very inspiring speech. He is such a sweet guy and I found his positivity and sincerity to be quite moving. I have no idea who shared this video on my page as they did it anonymously, but thanks for sharing anyway!

        Reply
  10. Kate

    Hi Luke,
    first of all thanks a lot for your great job: a lot of people all around the world are grateful to you because, by means of your help, now they speak english for free and in a world where people know the price of everything and the the value of nothing…well, you are a man of value.
    In regard to your competition, i loved so much listening to all the eight Entries. I was thinking, it might be cool if you pick all the most voted competitors of any Entry and put them together in a new podcast episode. In my opinion It would be worth the effort listening to all the best in a row, in order to compare them in better way. Viceversa, someone might get hundreds of votes not because he is the best one but only the best among the competitors of his own Entry. It’s just a suggestion and I’d like to know what do you think about.
    Bye, bye, bye and thanks again for what you do for all of us.
    Kate

    Reply
    1. Luke Thompson Post author

      Thanks for your encouraging words Kate :)
      I’ve decided that I’m going to have 8 winners from this competition, and each one will feature in their own short interview. I know some people will get more votes than others, but I just decided to go for this slightly more balanced version. Playing the 8 winning recordings again is a pretty good idea and I am definitely considering it. Maybe at the end of September when the votes have been counted, I can work out the winner from each episode, then play their recordings again.
      Then later I can interview each one (for up to 20 minutes perhaps) and feature those interviews in a couple of episodes.
      The thing is, I’m a little wary of publishing repeated content on the podcast, and also I expect that some listeners are not following the competition that closely. Anyway, we’ll see.
      Thanks for the suggestion.
      Luke

      Reply
  11. Salman Gul

    Hey this is SaLman nd my vote is for Mr.Hamid from Pakistan…like his voice nd ancient..best of LucK Mr.HamiD keep it up..

    Reply

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