404. British Accents in The Lord of the Rings (Part 1)

Talking about the different accents you can hear in the Lord of the Rings movies.

[DOWNLOAD]

Why this subject, Luke?

First of all, Lord of the Rings is brilliant and it’s nice to talk about it.

Secondly, In the last episode I talked about accents a bit – specifically posh accents, and it made me think about the subject a lot. I started thinking about the different British accents you can hear in Lord of the Rings, and I thought that the movie is so popular and well-known that it could be a good way to get into the subject of accents.

IN this episode, let’s identify the different accents that you can hear in the films and consider the reasons why these accents were chosen for these characters. Along the way the plan is to listen to a few different British accents and get to know them a bit. There will probably be some general chat about LOTR too, but that’s not the main subject of the episode. I’d like to do other episodes later about the story of LOTR.

Actually, this is just one episode about accents that I’ve been inspired to do today. If I have time I might record another one in which I go into some more specific details about “posh” accents and “posh” people.

And I’d like to do similar ones about other accents you can find in the UK.

But this one will cover quite a lot of different accents because there is quite a bit of variety in the LOTR film universe.

Another summary of accents in the UK

It’s based on region – different accents for different regions.

It’s also related to class – generally speaking. People from a working class background tend to speak with the regional accent from the area where they live or grew up. Those regional accents get less strong as you move up the social classes, with middle and upper-middle class people speaking a less region specific-accent known as RP (received pronunciation) or BBC English (like me). There are still some regional variations of RP but generally if people speak like me they’re speaking standard British RP. Then as you continue to the upper-class people, who you might describe as “posh” you start hearing a kind of heightened-RP or “posh” accent. The Queen is the poshest person in the country.

This isn’t always the case of course. You might find someone who comes from a very posh aristocratic family who doesn’t speak heightened-RP. Similarly, you might find someone who is very wealthy and powerful who speaks with a regional accent. There are exceptions, and also there’s an argument to say that the class system doesn’t apply any more, etc. But, honestly I think that it’s still true. Working class background? – You’ll probably speak with a regional accent (unless you lost it somewhere along the way) and if you’re middle class you’re more likely to speak RP like me, and if you’re upper class you’re more likely to speak heightened-RP or “posh” English.

It also relates to time. Heightened-RP used to be a lot more normal and it sounds pretty old fashioned by today’s standards. There was a time when everyone on the BBC spoke with heightened-RP “This is the voice of the BBC”. Nowadays most of the voices are standard-RP and plenty of TV presenters have regional accents, especially on shows that have a broad popular appeal. E.g. An entertainment show which is on the TV at 7pm in the UK and attracts a huge audience features middle-class presenters who speak with slight regional accents because these days people like that. It means you’re a normal person who comes from a normal local place. The news is still read by people with RP, because it’s neutral and sounds educated and therefore well-informed.

We do have certain associations with different accents, and these associations are quite complex. E.g. people say they find certain accents more or less trustworthy, warm, sexy, irritating, urban, rural, high-class, low-class etc.

In the UK people judge each other by their accents all the time, without realising it. It’s a big indicator of social class, education or even wealth for example. We shouldn’t judge each other by our accents, but we do.

I’m not talking here about how you can learn to speak with a British accent. THat’s another topic for another time. One thing I will say is that I think the most important thing is that you speak clearly and the other people around you can understand exactly what you want to say. Let clarity guide you, not how you perceive the social status of different accents. If you’re looking for an accent that makes you sound posh, watch out because other people might not have positive associations with “posh” for example.

“It is impossible for an Englishman to open his mouth without making some other Englishman hate or despise him.”
George Bernard Shaw, Pygmalion (1916) preface

This means that there isn’t one single accent which is completely neutral and free of prejudice from others. This proves that the class system still exists. If I open my mouth in some places, people will immediately assume that I’m well-off and will probably hate me. Just a few people, I hope. E.g. if I went to do a comedy show in Liverpool on a Saturday night in front of a large crowd of slightly drunk Scousers, I’m sure some of them would take an instant dislike to me because I have a middle-class London accent.
So, there is no accent which is universally neutral. The main thing is that you’re clear and that you’re not ashamed of your roots. OK!

What about Lord Of The Rings?

First of all, LOTR is set in a fantasy world. The writer JRR Tolkein created this world originally as an exercise in linguistics. He was a linguist and he created his own languages and then needed a world for them to exist in. He was also interested in the idea of creating a mythology for the UK, because all our old myths and legends had been lost due to all the times we’d been invaded over the years. Our old Celtic mythologies have been replaced by Saxon or Norse ones from Denmark for example, or replaced with Judo-Christian narratives from the Old Testament, or Greek myths and so on. So, he created a made-up world, wrote his own myths and legends and created different languages for the made-up races of people, elves, orcs, dwarves, hobbits, ents and others to speak.

The characters either spoke different languages, or spoke English with different accents. The accents in the book were never aligned with real accents in the real world. We had to just imagine the accents in our heads – but the characters in the book are so well described, and the context is so rich that it’s not difficult to imagine these voices full of richness, roughness, smoothness, humour, spirit, courage, malice etc. We just imagined the accents in our heads, or just had a gut feeling about how the characters would speak.

Gandalf, for example, you imagined could be so warm and entertaining, like a fantastic old teacher in some dusty old school, but then he could be incredibly sharp, complex and frightening too. You imagined the Hobbits to have local accents of the countryside, reflecting their limited worldview, their proximity to nature. It makes you think of local accents from countryside areas of the UK. But the accents were never really directly described in the books.

So, turning the books into films was always going to be a challenge, because the filmmakers had to turn those made-up accents into real-world accents.

Which accents should each character have? This question was probably just as important as choosing what they should look like, or what they should wear. Perhaps it was more difficult because their appearances are clearly explained in the books. Choosing the accents though, was a matter of matching the right accent to the personality traits of the characters.

This is quite interesting because it tells us a little bit about how we immediately judge people based on their accents. E.g. some accents make you think of royalty, of ruralism, of rugged countryside etc. The accents, to an extent, are part of the landscape. The accents are quite closely connected to certain geographical locations in the real world.

So, the rolling hills of Hobbiton, the sharp peaks and deep chasms of the Misty Mountains and the large halls and palaces of Gondor – all of these have accents that seem appropriate to them.

What are the accents in LOTR?

All the accents are British. There are no American accents in the film, even though some of the actors are American, notably Viggo Mortenson (Aragorn), Sean Austin (Sam Gamgee) and Liv Tyler (Arwen). Also there are several Australian actors – Hugo Weaving (Elrond) and Cate Blanchett (Galadriel).

Why are the accents all British? I thought British accents in movies were just for the bad guys?
‘Otherness’
‘Old world’
Recordings of Tolkien’s readings of his own work – Tolkien’s own voice

Characters / Races

Frodo – speaks in standard RP

Hobbits – Generally the Hobbits are associated with a kind of rural, local charm. They’re warm characters with a strong sense of local identity. They work on the land. Imagine any part of England about 100 years ago. Farmers, local shopkeepers and things like that. All the hobbits have accents to give this kind of colour to their characters. Frodo speaks with RP because he’s from a slightly higher class than the others. Interestingly, the Hobbits don’t let their class differences come between them, which is another attractive thing about them.

Sam – comes from the South West – a stereotype of the country ‘bumpkin’. it’s a soft and homely accent. Working class because Sam is definitely a working class country boy to Frodo’s upper-class master.

Pippin – Scottish. Again there’s no real reason for this beyond giving him slightly old-world foreign charm. But it’s a fairly middle-class Scottish accent. Wikipedia: The filmmakers originally planned for Boyd to adopt an English accent for the role, in keeping with the other hobbits; however, Jackson found that Boyd’s comic timing was not as keen when he was not using his native accent. Therefore, it was decided to allow Boyd to play the role with a Scottish accent; the decision was justified by the observation that the Took-land in which the Took clan lived was a very hilly region of the Shire and was therefore vaguely similar to Scotland, and that the Tooks invented the game of golf, just like the Scots.

Merry – the actor comes from Stockport near Manchester and keeps his normal accent. Again, a bit of local ‘colour’. It’s not really strong.

Aragorn, Gandalf, Legolas, Galadriel, Elrond, Saruman – RP / Heightened RP – all slightly old fashioned. These are the high-class people in the story, particularly the elves who all speak high RP (upper RP). An old, posh type of language which makes them all sound like thespians or ex-public schoolboys. This reflects their high status in the story and the richness and depth of their culture.

Boromir – Sean Bean (the actor) has a Yorkshire accent. He could easily have spoken RP just like the other stewards of Gondor but Sean Bean’s natural Yorkshire accent gives his character a bit of authenticity and northern ruggedness. It’s an accent with character and some sense of landscape, like the film. Also, Boromir doesn’t have the same lineage as Aragorn. In the film his family are the stewards of Gondor – they’re just there while the proper royal family is not around. He’s high-class, but not as high-class as Aragorn.

Gimli – Welsh. It’s supposed to be Welsh I think. I guess this reflects the harshness but warmth of the dwarves. Certainly they are parochial and characterful. In The Hobbit the dwarves all have local accents, except Thorin who speaks RP. Basically, if you want characterful accents with an old world flavour, go with British dialects. If you want that old world flavour with a touch of class – it’s old school RP.

Orcs – cockney. We associate this with thugs, gangsters and criminals (not every time of course!)

Other characters: Gollum, Bilbo, Eomer, Theoden, Eowyn, Treebeard, Sauron.

In part 2 let’s listen to some spoken samples in these different accents

lotr

  • Catherine Bear

    I love this performance of Benedict Cumberbatch. :)

    www.youtube.com/watch?v=FHuXSZv6Tqs

  • Agnes

    Hi Luke,

    I enjoyed listening to this episode because I like exploring new things in English, however I didn’t know about such different accents in this language, as Nick said,it is also a new part of English for me.

    In my opinion, people here, who have a higher level of English or maybe have been living in English speaking country, may notice differences clearly. In my example, of course I notice differences but I can’t even guess where is this person come from, region and so on.

    By the way, yesterday I had a small talk with my teacher who is from Scotland living in Spain now, and we were talking about various accents in languages, especially in English, and she said that it doesn’t matter if a person speaks perfectly in British or some other English, this person has to be understood by others, and that’s it. She said that it feels strange when she is hearing a foreigner speaking with Scottish accent, it sounds unnatural, despite that, this person is proficient in English.

    Anyway, I ‘m delighted to listen to news (for me), even I’m not a fan of The Lord of the Rings, but it encouraged me to read that book in English, and this is the first wish for a New Year:-)

    have a nice day
    cheers

    • Catherine Bear

      Agnes, The Fellowship of the Ring is written in a beautiful English. I think you will like it. And it is also easy to understand. :)

      • Agnes

        Thanks Cat, I think the best idea is to get an audiobook and printed version of a book in order to read and listen at the same time. Do you use the audioboom? Do they offer both of versions?

      • Catherine Bear

        Hi Agnes, do you mean Amazon / Audible? I’m sure they have everything. I have a paperback copy, but not an audibook, unfortunately. Yes, having a book and a good audiobook will be great. But it is important that later on you listen to the audio without the text too.
        But honestly Agnes, just go for a book that you love. You know, this emotional thing is very important. Don’t feel obliged to read it only because others have read it and praise it. It should be something truly enjoyable for you personally. :)
        Cat

      • Agnes

        yes I meant Audible, oo that’s great that I can find there everything. Today, just by chance, I have watched “The fellowship of the Ring” on television, can you believe, that for so many years I hadn’t seen it before? These kind of books and films were never my favorite. This episode encouraged me to see what is going on there, but to be sincere, it didn’t make me amazed or in the edge. Yes, there are loads of spectacular effects and probably watching it at the cinema would be more interesting than at home, but for sure, it is still not my favorite sort of films. Everyone has an own taste of this kind of thing, and I will not probably read it.

        By the way, my husband said that, at that time, when the trilogy of The Lord of The Ring had been released, everyone had been waiting for, it was a huge event, and watching it at the cinema was long waited.

        Anyway, reading and listening at the same time led to acquiring grammar better than only listening, you see grammar structures in the text, only listening can miss some structures, that’s what I have just noticed and that’s why I’d like to do this at the same time.
        Agnes

      • Catherine Bear

        Yes, listening and seing the sentences at the same time (you can even read along out aloud with the actor) — and this several times until it really sticks with you — and then just listening / or just reading (you’re going to have the actor’s voice in your head).

        The only book I’ve downloaded from the Audible is David Copperfield by Charles Dickens (I think I’ve told you already). There I tried to use this method. Also with some CDs and books from the Sherlock Holmes stories. But since I’ve wandered to the Wonderland of Luke, and discovered some OPPs as well, David Copperfield and Sherlock Holmes (my old good friends) get neglected by me. But I will go back to my old friends any time soon. :)

  • Nick

    What a complicated life there (in the UK)… Everybody resent each other because of their accents… wow I never thought that accents in the UK have so important role in people’s lives. Luke, thanks for this episode. You opened the UK in a new way for me. Even though I knew about different accents in the UK (and from your podcast too) but I somehow didn’t realized the deep meaning of accents in English life.
    But I don’t really understand how it happened that you have so many accents on not a big territory. I can understand that different levels of society may have different words in their vocabulary, but why they should have SO different accents especially when they live in one city or region…maybe it was people’s desire to make something with the language, or at least with pronunciation in order to be somehow unique from others. Like different groups of people or subcultures dress in different clothes or different nations has their own folk costumes.

    • It could be explained by the theory of ‘accommodation’ en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Communication_accommodation_theory

      • Nick

        It reminded me about the film Divergent, though it’s not the same thing.

      • Catherine Bear

        I didn’t see Divergent. Is it good, Nick?
        Yes, I find it so amazing, that in the UK (on this — sorry, Luke — rather a small country) there are so many different accents, classes, groups etc. Just unbelievable for someone who lives in Russia, for example.

        Maybe these groups in the UK (in DE too) are quite individualistic, meaning that they uphold their individuality, like their accents in our case, and don’t adjust to the other surrounding groups as easily and quickly, as it would be the case in a country with a rather collectivist culture. Just a thought.

      • Nick

        Well, I’m a big fan of sci-fi movies, that’s why I’ve seen Divergent, I kind of liked first two parts, the last film was a little bit boring for me. So, if you’re not desperate in seeking and waiting new sci-fi films all the time you can easily pass by this film.

      • Nick

        The last film which I liked very much is Chappie. This film was released in 2015, but I saw it recently and as for me it’s a cool movie. I also liked that makers of the film invited Die Antwoord in the film, they looked very natural and cool in the film, even though I don’t listen to them I liked their song “Enter The Ninja” at the end.

      • Nick
      • Catherine Bear

        Chappie sounds cool.
        Do you use a kind of Internet TV?
        I’m thinking of signing up for an internet TV service, but don’t know to which one. Usually I borrow video DVDs from the library or watch it online (especially Russian films). If I like a film very much then I buy a DVD (but quite rarely) — I only have the standards like LOR, SW, HP, some Hercule Poirot with David Souchet, BBC period dramas (classics), Yes Minister etc. Yesterday, I bought House of Cards I.

      • Nick

        Well, I think it’s easy to use Google or Amazon or iTunes ;)

      • Nick

        In Russia we also have such things like www.ivi.ru. You can watch many films for free there(they use ads for monetising).

      • Catherine Bear

        Ah, good to know. Thanks! I used to use intv.ru some time ago. But then just youtube. :)

      • Nick

        I see, also this site megogo.net is quite popular.

      • Catherine Bear

        Oh, I see, how I will spend the Christmas holidays — just watching Russian movies, and completely forget English. :)

        I hope people are not bothered here with our chat about films & Russian TV websites. ;)

      • Nick

        I think you also can use Netflix. Luke has said about Netflix in one of the episodes… with some preporations you can even watch TV shows and movies from sites like Hulu.
        Well, I think other people also can be interested such themes, so, I think everything is ok ;)

      • Catherine Bear

        What mysterious prepOrations do you mean, Nick? :)

        Well, I also hope that Luke won’t get furious about us. He said in one of his episodes, that he would get notifications about each new posting (poor Luke, I’m sorry for this — I hope, Luke, you just switch your notification off, programme like this: IF new post by CB –> THEN no notification, just calm down and ignore it. ;)

      • Nick

        Well, I’m saing about some servicies which hide your location, some of them even free. I think Luke’s interested in a large number of comments on his site…and I think he’s prepaired for our high activity :))

      • Catherine Bear

        LOL :))

      • Nick

        Though he always says that he reads all comments…

      • I sense all of your comments using the force.

      • Nick

        We only hope that you aren’t tired doing that ;)

      • Actually, I switched off the notifications on my phone a few weeks ago. Now I just check all the comments from my computer every now and then. I’m not bothered by it. It’s good to see that there are active conversations going on. :)

      • Nick

        By the way it seems that Hulu site now unblocked in Russia…

      • Nick

        Now I’m looking Captain America: Civil War look what they wrote in Russian on the car :)) Even added symbol of the Soviet Union LOL uploads.disquscdn.com/images/2bc14f5491b21a0b884d1de5e262f1e7bd2ed69d060c0e86cfbe9cebedd36271.png

      • Catherine Bear

        LOL :))
        In fact, there is some research going on reviving the Ice Age animals. :)

      • Nick

        Where? In Оймякон?

      • Catherine Bear

        In Yakutia, I mean.

      • Nick

        I see, archaeologists quite often find mammoths there. Especially their tusks. It’s everywhere there. In China I heard they like mammoths’ tusks. That’s why it costs very much money.

      • Catherine Bear
      • Nick

        Scientists’re having fun :)) Maybe one day they will clone a mammoth…

      • Catherine Bear

        Yes, you love science fiction; they love science nonfiction. ;)

      • Nick

        Another example from Captain America: Civil War…
        uploads.disquscdn.com/images/78ee507342b297804798d448d61597023303038b14de3aeb5768bd17138d7fcb.png
        I wonder are they complete idiots or what :))

      • Nick

        At least they could try google translate :)) It’s smarter than makers of this film.

      • Catherine Bear

        LOL :))
        It reminded me of the door sign “Trespassers will” above the Piglet’s door. :)

      • Nick

        Yes, kind of, but here it’s a box with files which are dated December 1991. It’s a mistake. The door sign “Trespassers will” above the Piglet’s door wasn’t a mistake ;)

      • Catherine Bear

        maybe it means something like “As of December 1991” (= files as of December 1991) :)

      • Nick

        Anyway you can’t say in Russian “Декабря 1991”. In film there was an event which is happened in 13(I don’t rememer the day) декабря 1991. And I think they desided to name the box with files from that date just simply cutting out the first number, but it’s not correct.

      • Catherine Bear

        Yes, it’s ridiculous.

      • Nick

        I desperately want to watch this…
        www.youtube.com/watch?v=dW1BIid8Osg&feature=youtu.be
        Because the first part was like a festival of fun and marvelous music!

      • Catherine Bear

        Was it really? The racoon and the baby wood stick look cute. :)

      • Nick

        Yeah, Rocket (racoon) is very funny, he’s kind of a little bandit that’s why he looks funny when he tries to do something bad what big bad guys usually do:)) I think that Rocket and baby Groot (baby wood stick) will do a cool team :)

      • Nick

        That’s baby Groot’s father ;)
        www.youtube.com/watch?v=ph_l7Pp_1mk

      • Catherine Bear

        What does groot mean? Sounds like “great root” in a short form. :)

        Father Groot looks wise and nice, but a bit terrifying too.

      • Nick

        I also doesn’t know what does groot mean… but maybe you’re right and it means great root ;) I don’t think that he was wise :)) because his only phrase was: “I’m Groot” :))

      • Nick

        Also father Groot was voiced by Vin Diesel ;)

      • Catherine Bear

        The Ent Treebeard was more talkative compared to this one, slow but definitely more talkative. :)
        The face of Groot in the last scene in your video looked very kind (and wise). One doesn’t have to be articulate to be wise, it can be quite the contrary. Just see how Yoda struggles with the language. ;)
        www.youtube.com/watch?v=RB6EERl0P30

      • Nick

        Yes, Groot maded a very wise thing at the end and saved other people except himself.

      • Nick

        Yes, you’re right. In fact in life very often a person who don’t say much may be smarter than everybody else.

      • Catherine Bear

        The Baby Groot doesn’t have a nose. How does he smell? :)

      • Nick

        I think maybe he can smell through all his body…

      • Catherine Bear

        Do you know the joke?

        – Lord Voldemort doesn’t have a nose. How does he smell?
        – Awful.

      • Nick

        Haha, it’s a good joke! I didn’t know this joke :))

      • Catherine Bear

        It was in one of the Mark and Simon Film Reviews episode. But I think Luke has mentioned it here as well. :)

      • Nick

        Well, maybe he has mentioned it, but I missed it anyway :(

  • Catherine Bear

    Dominic Bernard Patrick Luke Monaghan (Merry) was born in Berlin, Germany. He was living in different cities in Germany until he was 11 (according to Wikipedia).

    Maybe that’s why he doesn’t have the Manchester accent so much. Funny, he also has ‘Luke’ among his many middle names. :)

  • By the Way Luke, maybe you should do one episode about pragmatic competence.

    • Good idea. What made you suggest that by the way?

      • Well, it’s not just Sergei here, I recently noticed that some people from certain countries use vulgar language as a form of joke/banter and it can sound very offensive. And I do think that it some cases they don’t really mean to offend anyone, they just think the words can be thrown in willy-nilly because that’s what they would say it in their L1, and in their cultural context. I have witnessed that even on one very advanced student.

  • The Lord of the Rings has been my favourite thing until Game of Thrones arrived. Love the episode for the theme but more importantly for its linguistic value. Fantastic idea to do this Luke.

    • Catherine Bear

      Hi Zdenek. I’ve never seen Game of Thrones. I only saw the cover in a supermarket. And judging from the cover, it looked quite dark and dangerous to me. As I don’t like any horror and violence films, I’ve always looked away.

      Also the word “Game” sounded a little bit dangerous to me, like some bad guys playing violent games. But since you praise it so highly, Zdenek, I thought maybe it is worth to watch it. :) What is it that you like in this film, Zdenek, just in a few words? Thank you.

      • Catherine, it can get little bit dark in the world of Game of Thrones, that’s for sure. But I’m this sort of person these days.The Walking Dead also appeals to me for a similar reason.
        What I like most about GOT is how the author manages to create a world of rich history where you can clearly see parallels to our history and maybe even present time and portrays interesting and very diverse characters while also managing to set it in a believable fantasy world. It’s very gritty, visceral, evocative and vivid. And it is actually much more realistic than Lord of the Rings which may seem like a fairy tale in comparison to GOT. I love fantasy but I know a lot of people who aren’t into it who actually like GOT because the fantasy aspect does not dominate the whole thing. I think it boils down to a portrayal of all different aspects of human nature, often very dark. Martin not afraid to tackle all different aspects of human sexuality, including taboos such as homosexuality, prostitution and most shockingly even rape, psychopathy, sociopathy and all that. The Sword is not always mightier than the pen, but sometimes is. Evil can beat good. Good characters die easily in the world of GOT. In this sense it is very unpredictable which makes for a gripping drama.To me Martin is similar to Shakespeare in a way. And by the way, there are a lot of female characters in GOT and they play very important roles. If you look at LOTR, it’s pretty much much all males. In GOT you have female warriors, queens, a dragon rider, rogues…everyting.
        But Shakespeare is an easy read because it has a clear straightforward structure and storyline and the language seems to be easier, too (even in original). I struggled with the Song of Ice and Fire books a lot. I didn’t even finish the last book because of Martin’s style. It’s too big at times, too many characters, a host of reference, which means you can easily get lost. While some passages are gripping, some can drag on. It’s certainly not one simple story line, that’s why I love the TV Show more because I can actually follow it a lot easier. Especially if you supplement it with a podcast. And there are loads of podcast about GOT out there and some are really good. I love watching episodes of my favourite TV Shows and then listening to a podcast where they analyse them. It’s become part of my listening routine.
        To my mind, you have to be a patient reader and your English needs to be C2 in order to fully enjoy GOT books in English original. But that’s just my humble opinion.

      • Catherine Bear

        Thanks, Zdenek. It’s a great review. So you’ve found your pet subject, haven’t you? You’ve read the books, seen the TV shows and are listening to podcasts dedicated to this particular topic. I guess it’s how the language learning works the best (Luke’s saying it all the time too). :)
        Enjoy your Games then. :)
        I’m sure it’s a nice and welcome balance to your teacher job.
        Cat

  • SergeyA

    I don’t know what I hate more : fucking SW or fucking LOTR

    • Catherine Bear

      The good old SergeyA is back. :)

  • Евгений Кольцов

    i hope you will do some podcast about game of thrones)

    • There are some nice podcasts about the Game of Thrones out there (about both the TV show and the books) :)

  • Catherine Bear

    Wow, at last it happenned! I don’t believe my eyes! :) Thank the Maker! :)
    I’m soooo happy (even I haven’t listen to it yet, just flew over the text quickly — sounds exciting!!!!)
    Thank you Luke! It’s what I’ve been waiting for; and I’m sure many other LEPsters feel the same. I couldn’t but write a quick comment on it beforehand. Looking forward to a good goodnight story now.
    C.
    PS: Yesterday we’ve been watching The Star Wars A New Hope episode once again; we’ve wondered why all the evil guys speak PR (it is PR, I think?). It’s funny, in German translation all these nuances get lost, what a loss …

    • Nick

      “…in German translation all these nuances get lost, what a loss …”
      that’s why I prefer to listen foreign films without translation, but with subtitles. I think it helps me better feel original atmosphere of the film even if I don’t know the language. By the way it’s the same with poetry…a poem in one language is translated in different language it’s not the same poem.

      • Catherine Bear

        So do I, dear Nick. Absolutely agree.